Pipeline Analysis and Therapeutic Assessment for Pain Drug Development Analyzed in 2017


Published on : Jul 14, 2017

Albany, New York, July 14, 2017: At present, the pain management industry is largely categorized into, physical and medicinal treatment. Recent developments in the treatment of different types of pain have increased. The pain arising from the disorder such as migraine, osteoarthritis pain and neuropathic pain have increased the demand for effective pain management. A recent pipeline study, focusing on the drug development for these pain along most difficult-to-treat chronic and acute pain subtypes has been broadcasted to the wide repository of Market Research Hub (MRH), which is titled as “Pain Drug Development Pipeline Review, 2017”. The study discusses the past history, present status and future prospects of pain drug development.

The research analyzes that medicines that kill pain are called analgesics and they vary in how they work. No single painkiller can relieve all types of pain. This report provides comprehensive information on the therapeutics under development primarily for Osteoarthritis Pain, Migraine pain and Neuropathic Pain, along with a number of the most difficult-to-treat chronic and acute pain subtypes. In the first part, the report presents an executive summary of the different type of pain along with its causes, symptoms and treatment methods. This subsequent section analyses the pain therapeutics pipeline through a comprehensive review, which is segmented by stage of development, mechanism of action, route of administration, molecule type and molecular target.

Osteoarthritis, or degenerative joint disease, and is the most common type of arthritis. It is associated with the breakdown of a joint's cartilage. This further leads to rubbing of the bones against each other stimulating pain. On the other hand, Migraine is a particularly debilitating type of mostly head pain that can last for hours or days. Its cause is usually unknown. These headaches are often associated with nausea, vomiting, and extreme sensitivity to light and sound. Finally, neuropathic pain or neuralgia is described, which is a condition in which the sensory system is affected. Severe neuropathic pain has proved difficult to treat, which symbolizes an area of weighty unmet clinical need. As per the findings, the last decade has seen the addition of new premium products to the market, comprising a wave of drugs approved for the treatment of neuropathic pain conditions – a patient population that previously had very poor treatment options.

Moreover, the research study examines the size of these pipelines, which ranges from 62 products in osteoarthritis pain to 249 in neuropathic pain. Within osteoarthritis pain, prostaglandin G/H synthases 1 and 2 and the nerve growth factor receptors are being studied by the most pipeline products. In migraine, it is the 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin) receptors 1D and 1B which are being most frequently studied.

At last, the companies involved in the therapeutics development of Osteoarthritis Pain, Migraine pain and Neuropathic Pain are highlighted in detail along with their dormant and discontinued projects.

Click here to get more info with TOC in a PDF Format : http://www.marketresearchhub.com/enquiry.php?type=S&repid=1217017

About Market Research Hub

Market Research Hub (MRH) is a next-generation reseller of research reports and analysis. MRH’s expansive collection of market research reports has been carefully curated to help key personnel and decision makers across industry verticals to clearly visualize their operating environment and take strategic steps.

MRH functions as an integrated platform for the following products and services: Objective and sound market forecasts, qualitative and quantitative analysis, incisive insight into defining industry trends, and market share estimates. Our reputation lies in delivering value and world-class capabilities to our clients.

Research Assistance

For Enquiries, Call :

+1-800-998-4852US Toll Free

Email : sales@marketresearchhub.com

Back To Top